Audrey’s Cimmerian Tales Book Club

Author Interview: Aaron Michael Ritchey

& Review of Long Live the Suicide King


Long Live the Suicide King by Aaron Michael Ritchey (summary from

Seventeen-year-old Jim JD Dillinger knows exactly how his miserable suburban life is going to play out. At least drugs added a little chaos to his life, but after almost losing his soul, JD knows he has to quit. Now clean, he figures he has another sixty years of plain old boring life followed by a nasty death. JD decides to pre-empt God by killing himself. However, once he decides to die, his life gets better, more interesting, and then downright strange. New friends. Possible romance. And donuts. Lots of donuts. Once the end is in sight, every minute becomes precious.

My thoughts:

First of all, I’m so excited to have had the opportunity to interview Aaron. We met a couple of years ago at the Pikes Peak Writers Conference. Aaron had just released The Never Prayer, a YA paranormal romance with angels and demons and a girl who isn’t sure which is which, and I had just started writing a YA paranormal romance with angels and djinn (which I might actually finish someday). I thought The Never Prayer was well written and an emotionally compelling story (yes, I cried), so when Aaron released his new book I had to read it.

Ok, not going to lie – I cried during Long Live the Suicide King too. Aaron’s sophomore novel is filled with amazing side-kick characters, like Ingalora Blute and 1066, and I really loved how funny JD is, even in all his suicidal angst. It’s very well written and is an original story with a couple of unexpected twists. There is a lot of heart in this book, which is what keeps you going when it gets dark. As you may have guessed, there’s a lot of talk about suicide in the book. There’s some conversation these days about how we need diverse books especially in MG and YA (check out #WeNeedDiverseBooks) and hopefully that conversation will get bigger and bigger. And the diversity goes beyond gender, race, and religion, to sexual orientation, disabilities, and illnesses. Every book can’t be about mean girls and crushes. If you have ever had suicidal thoughts, a friend with suicidal thoughts, or lost a loved one to suicide (or yes to all three like me), this can be a difficult read. In the end, it’s the truths in the book that make it a fulfilling read.

So without further ado, my interview with Aaron:

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