“The Song of the Wandering Aengus” By WB Yeats Inspires Audrey

The Song of Wandering Aengus © Copyright William Butler Yeats, 1899. All rights reserved. Used by permission of the Creative Commons License.

The Song of Wandering Aengus © Copyright William Butler Yeats, 1899. All rights reserved. Used by permission of the Creative Commons License.

Maidens of the Sea

Summer break should be devoted to something big. Not like photographing every sunset, finding the perfect shade of nail polish, or seeing how many times you can watch The Fault in Our Stars and still cry big, but something really important. Like finding out what happened to Vanity Harrison.

I was two weeks into break and no closer to the truth, halfheartedly studying her house with my grandfather’s faded binoculars through a break in my curtains, my feet dangling off my bed, Fatty Fred happily purring on my back as he cut my lung capacity in half, when Mrs. Harrison drove up her circular driveway in the red convertible looking more like a Hollywood ingenue than a grieving mother had any right to. She parked in front of the elaborate Greek columns lining the exterior of the entryway and went inside. Just like normal. Just like she had everyday since she woke up and found Vanity gone.

“Gah! This is pointless, Fred.” I rested my chin on the edge of the bed, my arms hanging like weeping willow branches to the floor, and dropped the binoculars on the ground. I wanted to turn over and stare dejectedly at the ceiling, but I was at Fred’s mercy and he seemed pretty comfortable for the moment.

There was a soft knocking on my door before my dad pushed it open. I rolled my eyes. Luckily, he could only see my feet and Fatty Fred.

“Hey, honey.”

“Dad, you’re supposed to wait after you knock. What if I was naked?”

“It’s 10:30 in the morning. Why would you be naked?”

continue reading …

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Julie’s Cimmerian Tales Book Club: Webcomic Wednesday

Gunnerkrigg Court by Tom Siddell:

I’m a big webcomic reader, so I thought I would discuss one of my favorite webcomics, Gunnerkrigg Court, this week.

This award-winning comic follows the adventures of Antimony (Annie) Carver, a 13-year-old girl who has just begun attending school at Gunnerkrigg Court. The court is full of monsters (including a friendly ghost named Mort and a Minotaur) and mysteries. Annie befriends Kat, another student her age, and the two of them begin to explore the court and search for answers about its inhabitants and its purpose. Some of their adventures include infiltrating the headquarters of the court robots to retrieve a CPU, falling in love with a boy who becomes a bird, meeting creatures from Gillitie Wood (where students are forbidden to enter), and investigating the death of a woman named Jeanne.

If you’re into fantasy creatures, folklore (especially that of the British Isles), robots, science, and talking wolves, this comic is for you. Most of the chapters are episodic and can be read alone, but I recommend starting from the beginning to get the full complexity of the story arcs. Tom Siddell, the comic’s creator, does a great job of fleshing out a varied cast of characters that includes adults and children, fairies, demigods, and other magical creatures. He also sneaks in fun pop culture references here and there, and his sense of humor is understated but spot-on. (If you’re a new reader, don’t miss the comments he includes at the bottom of every comic page.)

Jump in on page 1 here. Tom’s style has evolved quite a lot over the course of the comic (it was launched in 2005). It continues to update Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays.